Return to HealthCap Home Page

Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Abuse Prevention: Direct Care Staff

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Per CMS, abuse is the willful infliction of injury, unreasonable confinement, intimidation, or punishment with resulting physical harm, pain or mental anguish. Abuse also includes the deprivation by an individual, including a caretaker, of goods or services that are necessary to attain or maintain physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being. Instances of abuse of all residents, irrespective of any mental or physical condition, cause physical harm, pain or mental anguish. It includes verbal abuse, sexual abuse, physical abuse, and mental abuse including abuse facilitated or enabled through the use of technology. Willful, as used in this definition of abuse, means the individual must have acted deliberately, not that the individual must have intended to inflict injury or harm. This 30 minute presentation was developed to assist caregivers in focusing on each resident’s right to be free of abuse and neglect.

    Per CMS, abuse is the willful infliction of injury, unreasonable confinement, intimidation, or punishment with resulting physical harm, pain or mental anguish. Abuse also includes the deprivation by an individual, including a caretaker, of goods or services that are necessary to attain or maintain physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being. Instances of abuse of all residents, irrespective of any mental or physical condition, cause physical harm, pain or mental anguish. It includes verbal abuse, sexual abuse, physical abuse, and mental abuse including abuse facilitated or enabled through the use of technology. Willful, as used in this definition of abuse, means the individual must have acted deliberately, not that the individual must have intended to inflict injury or harm. This 30 minute presentation was developed to assist caregivers in focusing on each resident’s right to be free of abuse and neglect.

  • Active Shooter Policy

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    An Active Shooter Policy.

    An Active Shooter Policy designed specifically for long-term care centers and laid out for your center to personalize as needed. The Active Shooter Policy is one component of the Active Shooter Program, available in our manuals category, that draws upon evidence-based research and information to help your team’s Disaster Preparedness planning.

  • Bloodborne Pathogens

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The presentation will provide the learner with information on bloodborne pathogens and the process for reducing the risk of an exposure.

    The presentation includes information on the risk of exposure to HIV, HBV and HCV, the vehicle of transmission of these bloodborne diseases, the role standard precautions play in reducing the risk of exposure and the steps to take if an exposure occurs.

  • Caring for Cognitively Impaired Residents

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Dementia disease is a progressive decline in cognitive function with memory loss. There are many types of dementia including HIV, vascular, Lewy Body, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, etc. Most are irreversible however when dementia is caused by thyroid disorders, drug interactions or dehydration, the symptoms may be reversible or treatable. Many families are unaware of their loved ones decline until the disease process has progressed significantly and the person is no longer safe. Some of this is denial and other times it is just a difficult thing to discuss with a parent or grandparent. No one will admit they have memory loss if they don’t have to as it is something that has stigma attached to it! This program was developed to assist you the caregiver in providing quality care to your residents with cognitive impairment while maintaining a safe, comfortable environment.

    Dementia disease is a progressive decline in cognitive function with memory loss. There are many types of dementia including HIV, vascular, Lewy Body, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, etc. Most are irreversible however when dementia is caused by thyroid disorders, drug interactions or dehydration, the symptoms may be reversible or treatable.


    Many families are unaware of their loved ones decline until the disease process has progressed significantly and the person is no longer safe. Some of this is denial and other times it is just a difficult thing to discuss with a parent or grandparent. No one will admit they have memory loss if they don’t have to as it is something that has stigma attached to it!

    This program was developed to assist you the caregiver in providing quality care to your residents with cognitive impairment while maintaining a safe, comfortable environment.

  • Caring for Residents With Bariatric Diagnosis

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    With the increasing rate of obesity, it is important to maintain the dignity of the resident. Obesity has increased from 14.4% to 30.9% from 1976 to 2000. Studies show that bariatric disease and its impact on one’s mobility and quality of life can cause bias, discrimination and social stigmas. There is clear, consistent evidence that individuals with obesity experience discrimination in family, social, education, and employment settings. Even the most compassionate caregiver may be reluctant to provide adequate care because of the threat of caregiver injury. The fear of injury is realistic and combined with the failure to provide satisfactory care to a complex resident, further perpetuation of discrimination toward the obese resident.

    With the increasing rate of obesity, it is important to maintain the dignity of the resident. Obesity has increased from 14.4% to 30.9% from 1976 to 2000.

    Studies show that bariatric disease and its impact on one’s mobility and quality of life can cause bias, discrimination and social stigmas. There is clear, consistent evidence that individuals with obesity experience discrimination in family, social, education, and employment settings.

    Even the most compassionate caregiver may be reluctant to provide adequate care because of the threat of caregiver injury. The fear of injury is realistic and combined with the failure to provide satisfactory care to a complex resident, further perpetuation of discrimination toward the obese resident.

  • Disaster Preparedness – What Is Your Role?

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Disasters happen, period! Yes, it can happen to you! As a direct care staff member, understanding the steps to take in the event of a disaster is an important part of your position. Our centers are full of frail, elderly residents who are here because they are no longer able to care for themselves. In the event of an emergency, they depend on you and your co-workers to provide protection. This 30 minute educational session was developed with you in mind! Yes, disaster preparedness training is a required training however it doesn’t have to be boring! Let’s keep it interesting, let’s talk about things that directly impact you and provide you with the basics for preventing and/or responding to disasters in your center.

    Disasters happen, period! Yes, it can happen to you! As a direct care staff member, understanding the steps to take in the event of a disaster is an important part of your position. Our centers are full of frail, elderly residents who are here because they are no longer able to care for themselves. In the event of an emergency, they depend on you and your co-workers to provide protection. This 30 minute educational session was developed with you in mind! Yes, disaster preparedness training is a required training however it doesn’t have to be boring! Let’s keep it interesting, let’s talk about things that directly impact you and provide you with the basics for preventing and/or responding to disasters in your center.

    Angie Szumlinski, LNHA, RN-BC, RAC-CT, BS

    Director of HealthCap Risk Management Services

  • End of Life Care: Direct Care Staff

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    As the population ages, medical advances are keeping Americans alive longer. In 1950 the average American was only expected to live to be about 68! Today the average life expectancy is 82! This educational session was developed to assist you, the caregiver, in helping a dying resident transition through the dying process and ease them to a peaceful death by understanding the dying process and the importance of respecting each resident’s individual wishes. Always remember, although it is difficult, it is a privilege to provide care to residents at their end of life and you are their source of care and comfort. This 30 minute program was developed to assist you, the direct caregiver, in ensuring your residents are provided with appropriate end-of-life care

    As the population ages, medical advances are keeping Americans alive longer. In 1950 the average American was only expected to live to be about 68! Today the average life expectancy is 82! This educational session was developed to assist you, the caregiver, in helping a dying resident transition through the dying process and ease them to a peaceful death by understanding the dying process and the importance of respecting each resident’s individual wishes. Always remember, although it is difficult,  it is a privilege to provide care to residents at their end of life and you are their source of care and comfort. This 30 minute program was developed to assist you, the direct caregiver, in ensuring your residents are provided with appropriate end-of-life care

  • History of Past Non-Compliance

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    History of Past Non-Compliance is a process of taking credit for identifying a deficient practice and implementing a QAPI action plan.

    Has your center determined a deficient practice existed? What do you do about it to help reduce regulatory deficiencies? History of Past Non-Compliance is a process of taking credit for identifying a deficient practice and implementing an action plan.  Using the History of Past Non-Compliance effectively will permit your center to regain regulatory compliance and demonstrate monitoring and an active QAPI Committee.

  • Human Trafficking - Part 1 - We Must Make a Difference

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation will describe what human trafficking ​is as well as define the difference between human trafficking and smuggling​. Participants will learn about “red flags” to assist in identifying human trafficking​ and the process of reporting suspected human trafficking.

    Nursing Home Administrators and Licensed Nurses have continuing education requirements encompassing training on identification and reporting procedures Human Trafficking.  Human trafficking affects millions of men, women and children around the world including the United States. Human trafficking is modern-day slavery and involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act.

    Traffickers look for people who are susceptible for a variety of reasons, including psychological or emotional vulnerability, economic hardship, lack of a social safety net, natural disasters, or political instability. The trauma caused by the traffickers can be so great that many may not identify themselves as victims or ask for help, even in highly public settings.

    Understanding how to identify and report potential human trafficking crimes to law enforcement is paramount to the safety of the public as well as the victim. Together we can make a difference.

    Angie Szumlinski (Moderator)

    Director, HealthCap RMS

    Ms. Szumlinski is a dedicated, proven leader in long-term care with a wealth of experience in operational and clinical aspects of the industry.  Experienced as an Administrator, Director of Nursing, Corporate Quality Assurance Coordinator, and as an independent consultant Ms. Szumlinski is respected for success in assisting facilities with achieving and maintaining regulatory compliance.  Ms. Szumlinski has strong leadership abilities with an interdisciplinary team approach to implementing and monitoring quality systems.  Previous owner of two skilled nursing facilities in the state of Michigan Ms. Szumlinski is the Director of HealthCap Risk Management Services. 

    Erica Holman (Moderator)

    Senior Risk Manager, HealthCap RMS

    Erica Holman, BA, LMSW, LNHA, CDP works nationally as a Risk Management Consultant with HealthCap RMSErica has been a licensed nursing home administrator since 1995 and she specializes in “regulatory distress” by developing plans of correction, person-centered care programs, education and systems to attain and maintain quality improvement initiatives. Erica has expertise in employee recruitment and retention, transitioning ownership, QAPI and 5-star ratings. Erica has been a Silver Examiner for the AHCA Quality Awards program since 2010 and serves as the Social Work consultant for the Health Care Association of Michigan.  

  • Human Trafficking - Part 2

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Nursing Home Administrators and Licensed Nurses have continuing education requirements encompassing training on identification and reporting procedures Human Trafficking. Human trafficking affects millions of men, women and children around the world including the United States. Human trafficking is modern-day slavery and involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act.

    Nursing Home Administrators and Licensed Nurses have continuing education requirements encompassing training on identification and reporting procedures Human Trafficking.  Human trafficking affects millions of men, women and children around the world including the United States. Human trafficking is modern-day slavery and involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act. 

    Traffickers look for people who are susceptible for a variety of reasons, including psychological or emotional vulnerability, economic hardship, lack of a social safety net, natural disasters, or political instability. The trauma caused by the traffickers can be so great that many may not identify themselves as victims or ask for help, even in highly public settings.  

    Understanding how to identify and report potential human trafficking crimes to law enforcement is paramount to the safety of the public as well as the victim. Together we can make a difference.