CDC Resources

  • Antibiotic Use in the United States, 2023 Update: Progress and Opportunities

    As the landscape of healthcare delivery changes, antibiotic stewardship guidance is evolving to support stewardship implementation, and ensure appropriate treatment of infections for all patients across the healthcare spectrum.

  • Section 3: Observation Form - Healthcare Laundry

    This form is intended to guide observations of processes used in healthcare laundry whether it is performed on or offsite. This form is limited to healthcare textiles, examples of which include bed linens, towels, washcloths, patient gowns, and uniforms owned by the facility and used in patient or resident care. It is not intended to evaluate personal laundry, such as long-term care resident clothing. 

  • Section 3: Observation Form - Wound Care

    This form is intended to guide observations of wound care practices at the healthcare facility. For the purposes of this tool, wound care refers to local care (e.g., debridement, dressing changes) to facilitate healing of breaks in the skin (e.g., ulcers, surgical wounds). While the practices being assessed (e.g., prevention of cross-transmission) apply wherever wound care is performed, the level of detail included in the tool is likely not sufficient to fully assess practices in specialty areas like burn units.

  • Section 3: Observation Form - Point of Care (POC) Blood Testing

    This form is intended to guide observations related to POC blood testing performed and equipment used by the healthcare facility. 

  • Section 3: Observation Form - Injection Safety

    This form is intended to guide observations for preparation and administration of injectable medications (pages 2-9)

    and immediate use sterile compounding (page 10).

  • Section 3: Observation Form - High-level Disinfection and Sterilization

    This form is intended to guide observations of medical device reprocessing performed by the healthcare facility. 

  • Section 3: Observation Form - Environmental Services (EVS)

    This form is intended to guide EVS observations. In outpatient settings, emphasis should be placed on the process for cleaning and disinfecting non-critical equipment, medication preparation areas, and high-touch surfaces in procedure rooms between patients.

  • Section 3: Observation Form - Transmission-Based Precautions (TBP)

    This form is intended to guide TBP facility (pages 2-5) and healthcare personnel (pages 6-11) observations. This form is intended primarily for use in acute care facilities and long-term care facilities.

  • Section 3: Observation Form - Hand Hygiene

    This form is intended to guide hand hygiene-based facility and healthcare personnel observations.

  • Module 10. Antibiotic Stewardship Facilitator Guide

    This form is intended to aid an ICAR facilitator in the review of a healthcare facility’s antibiotic stewardship policies and activities. This interview should be conducted with antibiotic stewardship lead(s) if possible.

HHS Resources

  • OIG Semiannual Report to Congress Spring 2023

    Semiannual Report to Congress summarizing the activities of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of Inspector General (OIG), for the 6-month period ending on March 31, 2023.

  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020-2025

    The Dietary Guidelines is designed for professionals to help all individuals ages 2 years and older and their families consume a healthy, nutritionally adequate diet. The information in the Dietary Guidelines is used in developing Federal food, nutrition, and health policies and programs.

  • HHS Cybersecurity Task Force Provides New Resources to Help Address Rising Threat of Cyberattacks in Health and Public Health Sector

    This new Knowledge on Demand platform offers awareness trainings on these five cybersecurity topics: social engineering, ransomware, loss or theft of equipment or data, insider accidental or malicious data loss, and attacks against network connected medical devices.

  • The SHARE Approach

    AHRQ’s SHARE Approach is a five-step process for shared decision making that includes exploring and comparing the benefits, harms, and risks of each option through meaningful dialogue about what matters most to the patient.

  • Overdose Prevention Strategy

    This page outlines strategies for overdose prevention, harm reduction, treatment, and recovery.

  • National CLAS Standards

    CLAS is a way to improve the quality of services provided to all individuals, which will ultimately help reduce health disparities and achieve health equity. CLAS is about respect and responsiveness: Respect the whole individual and Respond to the individual’s health needs and preferences.

  • AHRQ-Funded Patient Safety Project Highlights

    This publication summarizes AHRQ’s investments in this promising pathway toward better care, including examples of project findings and products, collective outputs, and impacts of this work. 

  • Chartbook on Patient Safety

    This Patient Safety Chartbook is part of a family of documents and tools that support the National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report (NHQDR). The NHQDR is an annual report to Congress mandated in the Healthcare Research and Quality Act of 1999 (P.L. 106-129

  • Tips for Engaging Diverse Partners

    Building relationships with external partners that reflect the lived experience of individuals served by your organization can help you understand how best to meet those individuals’ needs and ultimately end disparities. Thoughtful outreach, feedback mechanisms, and engagement are foundational to building long-term, reciprocal relationships with diverse communities

  • Tips on Equitable Communication Practices in a Policy Context

    This tip sheet highlights the importance of using equitable communication practices in a policy context. It also includes tips and guiding questions for consideration as well as a list of additional resources.

CMS Resources

  • CMS COVID-19 Emergency Declaration Blanket Waivers for Health Care Providers (Dated 12/1/20)

    CMS is empowered to take proactive steps through 1135 waivers as well as, where applicable, authority granted under section 1812(f) of the Social Security Act (the Act) and rapidly expand the Administration’s aggressive efforts against COVID-19. As a result, the following blanket waivers are in effect, with a retroactive effective date of March 1, 2020 through the end of the emergency declaration.

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  • Emergency Declaration Blanket Waivers (Posted 4/29/21)

    The Administration is taking aggressive actions and exercising regulatory flexibilities to help healthcare providers contain the spread of 2019 Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19). CMS is empowered to take proactive steps through 1135 waivers as well as, where applicable, authority granted under section 1812(f) of the Social Security Act (the Act) and rapidly expand the Administration’s aggressive efforts against COVID-19. As a result, the following blanket waivers are in effect, with a retroactive effective date of March 1, 2020 through the end of the emergency declaration.

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  • The CMS Innovation Center’s Approach to Person-Centered Care Listening Session (March 31, 2023)

    The CMS Innovation Center held a virtual listening session as part of our continuing partnership with patients.

  • Upload an Assessment for MDS Users

    The How to Upload an Assessment for MDS Users training video provides steps for uploading MDS assessments to iQIES.

  • Design for Care Compare Nursing Home Five-Star Quality Rating System: Technical Users’ Guide, July 2023

    Effective with the July 2023 refresh, CMS revised the nursing-home level exclusion criteria on erroneously high number of administrators applied to the administrator turnover measure.

  • CMS Framework for Health Equity 2022–2032

    The CMS Framework for Health Equity provides a strong foundation for our work as a leader and trusted partner dedicated to advancing health equity, expanding coverage, and improving health outcomes. This includes strengthening our infrastructure for assessment, creating synergies across the health care system to drive structural change, and identifying and working together to eliminate barriers to CMS-supported benefits, services, and coverage for individuals and communities who are underserved or disadvantaged and those who support them.

  • Improving COVID-19 Outcomes in Nursing Homes Across America

    This is an audio series that gives you a closer look at the projects and the people who are improving health care quality and outcomes. These brief conversations include detailed show notes for even more insights into the process behind health care quality improvement – and how you might adapt these to your own organization.

  • SNF Quality Reporting Program FAQs

    This document contains the answers to frequently asked questions about The Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) Quality Reporting Program (QRP

  • Medicare Parts C and D Oversight and Enforcement Group - Division of Audit Operations
    This document outlines the program audit process for 2022. CMS will send engagement letters to initiate routine audits beginning February 2022 through July 2022. Engagement letters for ad hoc audits may be sent at any time throughout the year. The program areas for the 2022 audits include: CDAG-Part D Coverage Determinations, Appeals, and Grievances; CPE: Medicare Part C and Part D Compliance Program Effectiveness; FA--Part D Formulary and Benefit Administration; MMP-SARAG--Medicare-Medicaid Plan Service Authorization Requests, Appeals, and Grievances; MMPCC--Medicare-Medicaid Plan Care Coordination; ODAG--Part C Organization Determinations, Appeals, and Grievances; SNP-CC--Special Needs Plans – Care Coordination
  • Quality in Focus—Resources for Addressing LTC Medication Error Citations – For Providers (LTC-QIF-4) - CMS
    This QIF provides resources that may aid LTC providers in recognizing potential medication error deficiency citations and developing a Plan of Correction.

NIH Resources

  • Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Treatment Guidelines
    The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Treatment Guidelines is published in an electronic format that can be updated in step with the rapid pace and growing volume of information regarding the treatment of COVID-19. The COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel (the Panel) is committed to updating this document to ensure that health care providers, patients, and policy experts have the most recent information regarding the optimal management of COVID-19 (see the Panel Roster for a list of Panel members). New Guidelines sections and recommendations and updates to existing Guidelines sections are developed by working groups of Panel members. All recommendations included in the Guidelines are endorsed by a majority of Panel members (see the Introduction for additional details on the Guidelines development process). Major revisions to the Guidelines within the past month are as follows:
  • NIH - Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Infection
    Everyone who has symptoms that are consistent with COVID-19 and people with known high-risk exposures to SARS-CoV-2 should be tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Such testing should employ either a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) or an antigen test to detect SARS-CoV-2. Testing may also be used for screening, determining the length of a patient’s isolation period, and other nondiagnostic purposes.
  • COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines – What’s New in the Guidelines
    The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Treatment Guidelines is published in an electronic format that can be updated in step with the rapid pace and growing volume of information regarding the treatment of COVID-19. The COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel (the Panel) is committed to updating this document to ensure that health care providers, patients, and policy experts have the most recent information regarding the optimal management of COVID-19 (see the Panel Roster for a list of Panel members). New Guidelines sections and recommendations and updates to existing Guidelines sections are developed by working groups of Panel members. All recommendations included in the Guidelines are endorsed by a majority of Panel members (see the Introduction for additional details on the Guidelines development process). Major revisions to the Guidelines within the past month are as follows:
  • Pain Assessment in Hospitalized Older Adults with Dementia and Delirium
    Pain can have negative effects leading to prolonged hospital stays. Determining the presence of uncontrolled and untreated pain in patients with cognitive impairments such as delirium, dementia, and delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) is challenging. One tool commonly suggested for use in assessment of pain in older adults with cognitive impairment is the Pain Assessment In Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) scale. Proper use of the PAINAD scale as part of a comprehensive pain management plan can help reduce the likelihood of a patient experiencing unrecognized and untreated pain. Using an individual example, this article illustrates best practices in pain assessment and management for a woman experiencing DSD during an acute hospitalization.

Other Outside Resources

  • The Same Medications but Different Labels: The Cost-Saving Role of FDA-Authorized Generics and Unbranded Biologics

    There has been much public attention on the cost of medications and therapeutics that are lifesaving but expensive – putting them out of reach for many patients. The good news is that some new non-branded medications have come out, including common insulins and inhaled medications, that provide the same therapeutic benefits for nursing home residents without the high price tag.

  • Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity

    The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) prohibits health plans from imposing barriers on access to mental health or substance use disorder benefits that don't apply to medical and surgical benefits. Learn about your legal rights, the information your health plan must give you, and how to appeal a denied benefit claim.

  • Guidelines and Recommendations for Laboratory Analysis in the Diagnosis and Management of Diabetes Mellitus

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders of carbohydrate metabolism in which glucose is both underutilized and over-produced, resulting in hyperglycemia. The disease is classified conventionally into several clinical categories, although these are being reconsidered based on genetic, metabolomic, and other characteristics and underlying pathophysiology. The revised classification published in 2014 (1) is indicated in Table 1. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is usually caused by autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic islet β-cells, rendering the pancreas unable to synthesize and secrete insulin (3). Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from a combination of insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion (4, 5).

  • Moving Forward: Nursing Home Quality Coalition

    Nursing homes are people’s homes. Nearly all Americans will have an experience with one of our nation’s nursing homes at some point in their lives – as a resident or care partner of a resident. Over half of mid-aged adults will spend at least one night in a nursing home over the course of their lives. (1)


    In surveys and conversations, nursing home residents tell us that they need more than just healthcare. Residents want to live in a place that supports positive interactions with staff members and the many others with whom they share their lives. They want nursing homes to ask and act on What Matters to them.

    The Moving Forward Coalition is taking decisive action now to move us toward those goals.

  • Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Treatment Guidelines

    The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Treatment Guidelines is published in an electronic format that can be updated in step with the rapid pace and growing volume of information regarding the treatment of COVID-19.

    The COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel (the Panel) is committed to updating this document to ensure that health care providers, patients, and policy experts have the most recent information regarding the optimal management of COVID-19 (see the Panel Roster for a list of Panel members).


  • Addressing Alcohol Use in Nursing Facilities

    While drinking any amount of alcohol carries risk, mixing alcohol with certain medications can cause nausea, vomiting, headaches, drowsiness, fainting, or loss of coordination. Alcohol can also make some medicines less effective or even harmful to the body.

  • Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS)

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is releasing a video tutorial to assist providers with guidance application and interview strategies for the cognitive assessment known as the Brief Interview for Mental Status (BIMS). This video tutorial is designed to provide targeted guidance for accurate coding using live-action patient/resident scenarios.

  • COVID-19: GAO Recommendations Can Help Federal Agencies Better Prepare for Future Public Health Emergencies

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented effect on the nation’s public health and economy. As of the week ending May 13, 2023, the U.S. had more than 1.1 million reported deaths attributed to COVID-19.(1)


    Since March 2020, the CARES Act and five additional laws (COVID-19 relief laws) (2) provided substantial federal funds (COVID-19 relief funding)—over $4.6 trillion as of April 30, 2023(3)—to help the nation respond to and recover from the pandemic. This COVID-19 pandemic response included a focus on mitigating COVID-19 health risks by making vaccines widely available to the U.S. population and expanding access to testing. As of May 10, 2023, about 70 percent of the eligible U.S. population—about 230 million individuals aged 5 and older—had been fully vaccinated against COVID-19.(4)

  • A Framework for Safe, Reliable, and Effective Care

    The framework described in this white paper provides clarity and direction to health care organizations on the key strategic, clinical, and operational components involved in achieving safe and reliable operational excellence — a “system of safety,” not just a collection of stand-alone safety improvement projects.

  • 5 Things Your Physician Contracts Should Have

    Physician arrangements are complex. If a hospital pays a doctor incorrectly, that can result in a compliance violation. And Stark Law interprets any accidental error as punishable with the same severity as fraud. So, it's important to ensure your physician arrangements are in tip-top (compliance) shape!